Deeply Rooted: Celebrating Filipino/a/x migrations, struggles, and contributions in Alameda

Deeply Rooted: Celebrating Filipino/a/x migrations, struggles, and contributions in Alameda

Lectures
October is Filipino American History Month. The first recorded presence of Filipinos in the continental United States took place just 225 miles away, in Morro Bay, California when enslaved Filipinos (referred to in the ship’s logs as Luzones Indios) jumped ship from the landing of the Spanish galleon Nuestra Señora de Esperanza. But it wasn’t until the 1930s that Filipinos began to see numbers in Alameda, with the founding of the Bohol Circle. Changes in immigration law and the opening of the Alameda Naval Air Station in the 1940s led to growth in the Filipinos in the East Bay. Over time, Filipino restaurants and corner stores opened. Join the Alameda Museum for a presentation led by the newly formed Alameda Island Filipinx (AIF) to learn about Filipino/a/x migrations, struggles, and…
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Chicana/Latina Arts Histories in the Bay Area

Chicana/Latina Arts Histories in the Bay Area

Lectures
Dr. Martina Ayala, executive director of the Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts, is also an accomplished filmmaker and arts curator. In this presentation, “Chicana/Latina Arts Histories in the Bay Area,” Dr. Ayala weaves together her journey of curating art and filmmaking with the work of the Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts in San Francisco. Her work focuses on Chicana film, community building, the arts, and spirituality while highlighting the rich tapestry of Latina culture. This virtual event will take place Monday, September 18, 2023 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Visit alamedamuseum.org or register on Zoom https://us06web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYpcumtpjIiEtxThSwPjGBDaNqViMD61Vma
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Placing Yourself in History: The Challenges of Writing a Memoir

Placing Yourself in History: The Challenges of Writing a Memoir

Lectures
Alameda Museum Virtual Speakers Series Join us for a lecture by historian and author Dorothy Lazard. Dorothy Lazard, former head librarian of the Oakland History Center, has written a well-received coming-of-age memoir, "What You Don't Know Will Make a Whole New World" about growing up in the Bay Area in the 1960s and 1970s. In this presentation she will share some of the challenges of writing a memoir, tips on how to frame family stories, and advice on how to place oneself in a larger cultural narrative. This virtual event will take place Monday, August 21, 2023, at 6:00 pm via Zoom. To register, visit: Zoom at https://us06web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwpcuCopzoqHtQCA4ZCvP5KEv2b8UjXmjMW
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From Haight to Love and Beyond

From Haight to Love and Beyond

Lectures
A conversation about place names in Alameda with Dennis Evanosky and Rasheed Shabazz. In 2019, the Alameda Board of Education renamed Henry H. Haight elementary school after it was learned that its namesake promoted racist and xenophobic politics. On December 5, 1867, Haight was inaugurated Governor of California. Join the Alameda Museum to learn more about that renaming process and others, as well as place names across the island. Speakers: Dennis Evanosky, former Museum President and Editor of the Alameda Post, and Rasheed Shabazz, co-facilitator of the Rename Haight and Rename Jackson Park groups. This virtual event will take place Monday, December 5, 2022, 6:30-8:00pm via Zoom. To register on Zoom: https://zoom.us/.
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Native American Heritage Month

Native American Heritage Month

Lectures
Join us for a conversation about Indigenous histories. In 2021, the City of Alameda voted to rename Andrew Jackson Park to Chochenyo Park. Chochenyo is the language of the Ohlone people, a local tribe of Native Americans. Alameda is located on the unceded land of the Ohlone. November is National American Indian Heritage Month. Join the Alameda Museum to learn more about local Native American history with Corrina Gould, tribal chair for the Confederated Villages of Lisjan Nation. This virtual event will take place Thursday, November 17, 6:30-8:00 pm via Zoom. To register on Zoom: https://us06web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMqf-ygqTsuG9DmptkrR56pb7LURGPbNQS6
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Exhibits Workshop: What displays and exhibitions do you want to see at the Alameda Museum?

Exhibits Workshop: What displays and exhibitions do you want to see at the Alameda Museum?

Lectures
We are working to improve the experience of the Alameda Museum and better serve our diverse community through our exhibits and permanent display, and we want to hear from you. What do you want to know about Alameda’s past, in the present and the future? What subject would you like to see more of in the permanent exhibition? What subject would you like to see less of in the permanent exhibition? What information about Alameda would be helpful to you, your family, and your community? What stories and knowledge is not being told by the Alameda Museum or other historical institutions? We invite you to visit the Alameda Museum during the month of October, and to complete our Exhibitions Survey to share your thoughts about our current displays. Then join…
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LATINO HERITAGE MONTH:

LATINO HERITAGE MONTH:

Lectures
A conversation about Latino identity, history, and politics with George Galvis. Monday, September 19 6:30 - 8:00 pm September 15 to October 15 is Hispanic Heritage Month. Alameda is a Spanish word often translated as a promenade. The region’s Spanish colonial legacy is often conflated with Latino heritage and identity. Join the Alameda Museum Virtual Speakers Series to learn more about Latino history, identity, and politics in the East Bay. Speaker: George Galvis, executive director of Communities United for Youth Restorative Justice (CURYJ) This virtual event will take place Monday, September 19, 6:30-8:00pm via Zoom. To register, visit Alameda Museum’s website: Alamedamuseum.org or Zoom: https://us06web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMlc-Cprz0iHN3HmaoaZgKRozd6RLHx5viB
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East Bay Yesterday

East Bay Yesterday

Lectures
An exploration of East Bay history and amateur historical storytelling with the host and producer of the podcast, Liam O’Donoghue Everyday people make history, and an increasing number of amateur historians are using the skills of historical research and storytelling to gather, preserve, interpret, share, and celebrate local history. For six years, journalist-turned-historian Liam O'Donoghue has hosted East Bay Yesterday,  an award-winning history podcast that focuses on the East Bay. His work has covered the East Bay cities of Oakland, Berkeley, Richmond, and beyond. In addition to the podcast, he’s hosted live events, a boat tour, and co-created the Long Lost Oakland map. Join the Alameda Museum Virtual Speaker Series to learn more about the DIY approach to historical storytelling of East Bay Yesterday, how O’Donoghue started his podcast, resources…
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Shaken, Not Stirred

Shaken, Not Stirred

Lectures, News
How did you fare during the August 24 quake that shook us awake at 3:30 that morning? Did you ever wonder what it was like to be in largest earthquake ever unleashed by the Hayward Fault? Author and historian Richard Schwartz will offer riveting first-hand accounts of people who lived through the October 21, 1868 earthquake on the Hayward fault. It measured 6.8; the recent temblor clocked in at 6.2… [caption id="attachment_1692" align="aligncenter" width="768"] A mill in Hayward was destroyed by the 1868 earthquake on the Hayward fault. Seismologists believe that this fault is due any time for another major eruption of similar magnitude. (source: UC Berkeley Sunsite)[/caption] Schwartz will use many photos and illustrations to illustrate what happened in the Bay Area before, during, and after the 1868 Hayward…
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Twenty-seven Years Aglow: How the Golden Gate Bridge Got Lit

Twenty-seven Years Aglow: How the Golden Gate Bridge Got Lit

Lectures
How many of us remember walking on the Golden Gate Bridge when it was turned into a temporary mall as a celebration of its fiftieth birthday? That event was then memorialized at the Oakland Museum in an enormous color print that seemingly showed a picture of every person who ventured there, estimated at half a million. [caption id="attachment_1466" align="aligncenter" width="768"] One of Richard Rutter’s working drawings for the tower lighting project.[/caption] Turns out that anniversary had a special Alameda connection. Local architect Richard Rutter spent most of the 1980s working for Bolles Associates in San Francisco. The Bolles firm was productive and wide-ranging, designing Candlestick Park, the General Motors Plant in Fremont, the San Jose Campus of IBM, Macys, Dayton Hudson, as well as Gallo and Paul Masson Wineries. Around…
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