East Bay Yesterday

East Bay Yesterday

Lectures
An exploration of East Bay history and amateur historical storytelling with the host and producer of the podcast, Liam O’Donoghue Everyday people make history, and an increasing number of amateur historians are using the skills of historical research and storytelling to gather, preserve, interpret, share, and celebrate local history. For six years, journalist-turned-historian Liam O'Donoghue has hosted East Bay Yesterday,  an award-winning history podcast that focuses on the East Bay. His work has covered the East Bay cities of Oakland, Berkeley, Richmond, and beyond. In addition to the podcast, he’s hosted live events, a boat tour, and co-created the Long Lost Oakland map. Join the Alameda Museum Virtual Speaker Series to learn more about the DIY approach to historical storytelling of East Bay Yesterday, how O’Donoghue started his podcast, resources…
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Shaken, Not Stirred

Shaken, Not Stirred

Lectures, News
How did you fare during the August 24 quake that shook us awake at 3:30 that morning? Did you ever wonder what it was like to be in largest earthquake ever unleashed by the Hayward Fault? Author and historian Richard Schwartz will offer riveting first-hand accounts of people who lived through the October 21, 1868 earthquake on the Hayward fault. It measured 6.8; the recent temblor clocked in at 6.2… [caption id="attachment_1692" align="aligncenter" width="768"] A mill in Hayward was destroyed by the 1868 earthquake on the Hayward fault. Seismologists believe that this fault is due any time for another major eruption of similar magnitude. (source: UC Berkeley Sunsite)[/caption] Schwartz will use many photos and illustrations to illustrate what happened in the Bay Area before, during, and after the 1868 Hayward…
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Twenty-seven Years Aglow: How the Golden Gate Bridge Got Lit

Twenty-seven Years Aglow: How the Golden Gate Bridge Got Lit

Lectures
How many of us remember walking on the Golden Gate Bridge when it was turned into a temporary mall as a celebration of its fiftieth birthday? That event was then memorialized at the Oakland Museum in an enormous color print that seemingly showed a picture of every person who ventured there, estimated at half a million. [caption id="attachment_1466" align="aligncenter" width="768"] One of Richard Rutter’s working drawings for the tower lighting project.[/caption] Turns out that anniversary had a special Alameda connection. Local architect Richard Rutter spent most of the 1980s working for Bolles Associates in San Francisco. The Bolles firm was productive and wide-ranging, designing Candlestick Park, the General Motors Plant in Fremont, the San Jose Campus of IBM, Macys, Dayton Hudson, as well as Gallo and Paul Masson Wineries. Around…
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